Exploring Frederik Pohl’s Heechee Saga Part 2 – Beyond the Blue Event Horizon

Hello, and welcome to part two of our exploration of Frederik Pohl’s Heechee Saga. Today, the focus will be on book two of the series, “Beyond the Blue Event Horizon.” In the previous novel, “Gateway,” the reader meets one Robinette Broadhead, the filthy rich, guilt-ridden expedition survivor and somewhat unlikable narrator.

The first thing the reader will notice about the book is this: it starts out in the third person, introducing a boy named Wan, currently living off-world on a Heechee artifact. Next, it switches to first person with a different narrator from the previous book. In this chapter, the reader is introduced to Paul, a pilot, and his family: his wife Lurvy, sister-in-law Janine and father-in-law, Peter.

It is here the reader learns the primary conceit of the story: Robinette Broadhead financed an expedition to find the Heechee Food Factory, so-called because it mines the basic elements of life from comets: Carbon Hydrogen Oxygen and Nitrogen or CHON for short.

As the story unfolds, the perspective eventually shifts from third-person whenever the explorers are involved to Broadhead’s perspective. Broadhead is, once again, our primary protagonist, whom everything revolves around. This time, however, he is much more likable.

Don’t let that last sentence fool you; he’s still selfish, odd and kind of an ass. It’s just that now, he’s not so guilty and self-absorbed. He has a machine intelligence in the guise of Albert Einstein with whom he spends most of his time. His wife, S. Ya Lovorovna from the previous book, helps build and create several machine intelligences throughout the story.

She also becomes a major part of the plot, but I won’t spoil that for you as the result of an interesting concept that was fleshed out in a disappointing way, the 100-day fever. It actually becomes a major plot point, directly affecting upcoming events in the series.

In “Beyond the Blue Event Horizon,” Pohl does an excellent job delivering on some of the suspense built up in “Gateway” and adds a few more interesting elements to the story. The one which sticks out the most in my mind is the Dream Bed, which is essentially a large telepathic transmitter. You can imagine what sort of shenanigans folks can get up to with one of those.

The title refers to the blue hue of the event horizon of a black hole, which is a reference to the end of “Gateway.” It is well done, interesting, engaging and a worthy successor to “Gateway.” There is substantially less psycho-babble and outdated concepts, but the book does suffer from a few anachronistic tendencies and a few inconsistencies. I still highly recommend it.

“Beyond the Blue Event Horizon” is available on Amazon here.

Exploring Frederik Pohl’s Heechee Saga Part 1 – Gateway

A look into Frederik Pohl’s excellent science fiction novel, “Gateway.”

I am a massive Science Fiction fan. I discovered a love of reading at an early age, thanks to authors like Robert A. Heinlein and Isaac Asimov. Since then, my reading has been all over the map. I’m not sure how the works of Frederik Pohl escaped my attention.

Earlier this year, I discovered a copy of his 1977 novel “Gateway” at my University Library. I haven’t felt this involved in a book series since reading Philip Jose Farmer’s Riverworld series. The book is more than a simple space-faring adventure; it is a psychological study of the rich, successful protagonist and his feelings of guilt surrounding his fame and fortune. I found the character so compelling that now, three books in, I’m hooked.

The book follows the story of a man named Robinette Broadhead, feeling rather guilty about something. The story opens with Broadhead speaking with an automaton psychiatrist whom he dubs Sigrid von Shrink. The story then alternates between Broadhead’s in-person (so to speak) sessions with the robot and flashbacks of his time on the Gateway asteroid, with several sidebars creating atmosphere for the narrative.

The story is told in the first-person, so the reader is right there in Broadhead’s shoes as he learns about the asteroid, finds romance, balks at taking missions and finally makes something of himself. Of course, along the way, there are some…shall we say, issues both wrought upon and caused by our protagonist. Broadhead himself is not a particularly likable character at first, but it feels as if he were designed to be that way, as later novels explore who he is more in depth.

The way he treats those close to him is quite deplorable at times, but some of the characters, like Gelle-Klara Moynlin end up playing an important role in the story later on.

“Gateway” is both futuristic and unique, introducing an alien race called the Heechee and their amazing faster-than-light technology.  The novel stands well on its own, but also serves to set up an entire series of adventures revolving around the Heechee and their wondrous technology.

The technology is fascinating, especially with the mystery surrounding it and the fact that despite the danger, humans constantly take out ships on prospecting missions to attempt striking it rich.

There are also, as with any older sci-fi story, some interesting anachronisms. Tapes are regularly used to store and retrieve information, for instance. There are a few more, but I recommend reading it for yourself to find out.

This is an excellent book, well-liked and a winner of both a Hugo and a Nebula award in 1978. The book was popular enough to spawn computer games, five sequels and a possible TV movie, which seems to be locked in production hell at the moment.

Of course, after what SyFy did to to Riverworld, perhaps we don’t need a Gateway film.

If you like “Gateway,” be sure to check out its sequels, “Beyond the Blue Event Horizon” and “Heechee Rendevous.” Stay tuned for part 2 of this series coming soon!

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