Finders Keepers by Stephen King – Book Review #1

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The below review has been written to keep things relatively spoiler-free. However, there may be a few items which spoil the first book, “Mr. Mercedes.” You have been warned.

“Finders Keepers,” the second book in Stephen King’s “Mr. Mercedes” trilogy seems like an altogether different novel than its predecessor, 2012’s “Mr. Mercedes.” At first, it seems disjointed, bouncing back-and-forth through different time periods and focusing on a character unrelated to the previous adventure: novelist wannabe, faux intellectual, angry, and irrational Morris Bellamy.

The story begins in 1978, when Bellamy, with two of his cohorts in tow, stage a home invasion of renowned author, John Rothstein. In the context of this story, Rothstein is the author of the “Jimmy Gold Trilogy,” a story chronicling the life of the titular character. The first two books show Jimmy making his way in the world; the third shows him settling down and selling out.

The cohorts are after his money, but Bellamy has other things in mind: disappointed with the way Rothstein ended the Jimmy Gold novels, Bellamy wants to confront the author and find out why. In doing so, he kills John Rothstein and thus begins a chain events that takes the reader through Bellamy’s life from being jailed in 1978 up to his parole in 2014.

At least one-third of the novel sets up the background of Rothstein, Bellamy, the manuscripts, the money and how the Mercedes Killer is involved. In the second part of the story, we meet our original characters: Retired detective Kermit “Bill” Hodges and the obsessive, socially awkward Holly, who now run their own business called, “Finders Keepers.”

Following the events of the “Mr. Mercedes,” Hodges has settled into a life of low profile cases of theft, bail jumping and private matters. Hodges also tends visit the near-comatose Brady Hartsfield often. Having been paralyzed by a smack to the head at the end of the pervious book, Hartsfield says and does nothing. However, eerie things seem to be happening around the hospital and it may just be Hodges’ imagination, but that picture does seem to be falling all by itself. But, that is a story for another day, which King expertly weaves into the narrative.

Between vignettes of the exploits of Hodges, Pete Saubers, Bellamy and other characters, King draws the reader into the story. Eventually, the threads of the story begin tying together, primarily through the characters.

Character development is strong, as is typical of King’s other works. Through the course of the story, we learn all about the history, motivations, lives and personalities of these characters. There is Morris Bellamy, the criminal, who buries the money and Rothstein’s notebooks. Then comes along Pete Saubers, the young boy who stumbles upon Bellamy’s hidden treasure and is faced with some interesting decisions.

The connection to the previous book is a bit tenuous here: it is revealed that Pete’s father, Tom was a victim of the Mercedes Killer and became injured as a result of the massacre. This eventually leads to severe marital tension between Tom and his wife, and significant financial troubles for the family. It’s a forgone conclusion for Pete to anonymously give the found money to his parents. Pete then begins to read the manuscripts contained in the notebook and falls in love with English Lit.

Of course, things have a funny way of working out, when Pete’s sister wants to attend a fancy school and Pete tries to find a way to raise money. Pete ends up falling in with the wrong person at the wrong time, which ultimately leads to a rather satisfying climax to the story.

In true King fashion, the prose delivers an understandable, relatable, interesting narrative. King begins in with a third person view, telling the story as it happened. Later, during the parts of the narrative featuring Hodges, Holly and Jerome, he switches to second person, similar to the style of the first book.

Though King is typically pigeon-holed into the horror genre, this book shows off his talents at writing a suspense/thriller. There are humorous elements sprinkled throughout, which match the tone of the previous book and stays consistent with what I’ve come to expect from this series.

This book is just as good as its predecessor, and in some places, much better. I found it compelling, unique, interesting and I simply could not put it down. Unlike some of King’s other stories, this one is brief and has a satisfying conclusion that makes you want to pick up the next one, “End of Watch.”

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