The Economics of Nostalgia

Yesterday, I passed up the opportunity to buy a Nintendo Switch console. I stopped at Target for a few sundry items and decided, on a whim, to check out the electronics section. As I approached the aisle, I caught a glimpse of red in the corner display case. Upon investigating, I confirmed my suspicion: I found a Nintendo Switch in the wild!

These days, that’s like finding a needle in a hay stack, considering Nintendo’s well-known inventory problems.

The sticker price, at $299.99 (plus tax), is a bit steep. The decision didn’t take long. I already own The Legend of Zelda: Breath of the Wild, for the Wii U. Now, Zelda is the only game I’m truly interested in playing on the system. Because the system doesn’t come with a pack-in title, I’d be shelling out an additional $59.99 (plus tax) for the game.

Should I decide upon acquiring additional games, it would cost even more. Let’s say I want a to procure a copy of the new Mario Kart 8, another title I already own on Wii U; it would cost upward of $60, depending on where I try to buy it.

Ultimately, I decided not to go through with buying the Switch. I returned today and, sure enough, it’s gone. You snooze, you lose, as they say. Of course, the proverbial, “they” ( who may or may not be giants) don’t have to think about paying bills and eating.  I’ve heard Nintendo Switch carts taste terrible, anyway, so I’ll have to go buy some groceries instead. I did buy some of those delicious coffee nut M & Ms, though, so it wasn’t a complete bust.

We’ve already discussed the debacle of the NES Classic Mini. However, inventory problems and shortsighted marketing aside, the Nintendo Switch could potentially become one of the greatest Nintendo systems since the SNES. It’s difficult to say, really.

What drives our interest toward these systems? Is it simple nostalgia for “the good old days” of gaming? Is it a desire to experience our favorites in HD? I wonder sometimes. I’m planning to bide my time and get the Switch when Super Mario Odyssey comes out, though. It looks like fun and will make me feel nostalgic for the older Mario games, but at what cost? About $400.

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